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Why having two engines and two schemas (Java, ABAP) ?

Hello,

I am a beginner in the world of Java for SAP. I am reading and reading loads of documentation (from SAP Help and SDN) but still feeling a little bit lost. Maybe you can help me with these conceptual questions, by briefly explaining the matter and/or pointing to suitable documentation. I apologize if my questions look naive.

1. Are both ABAP and J2EE engines intended for the same purpose? If not, which are the differences? If they are, why having two engines?

2. Each of the engines have their own schema. I guess this means that data are not directly shared, but just by means of BAPIs or RFCs, making it look pretty much like two completely remote and different systems. Why this approach? Where is the advantage?

Thanks in advance and kind regards.

Antonio Sánchez.

Former Member
Former Member replied

Hi Antonio,

Well your question is not an absurd one in fact its really very important for a beginner to learn the basic difference b/w these two Engines and why these are required.

<b>1. Are both ABAP and J2EE engines intended for the same purpose? If not, which are the differences? If they are, why having two engines?</b>

Ans: SAP has offered a additional programming environment with ABAP that is Java. Java is a standard in the industry whereas ABAP is only for the SAP system. Java and ABAP have much in common. We can develop application in any environment but then its good if we can integrate the industry standard(JAVA) to the proprietary standard(ABAP). Now as we all know JAVA applications really provide a good development framework so SAP thought of integrating JAVA with ABAP as well. So for ABAP environment they have ABAP engine and for JAVA they have JAVA engine.

<b>2. Each of the engines have their own schema. I guess this means that data are not directly shared, but just by means of BAPIs or RFCs, making it look pretty much like two completely remote and different systems. Why this approach? Where is the advantage?</b>

Ans: Yes you are right data is not directly shared with these two engines we require RFC's and BAPI's for exchanging the information between these two engines. ABAP still have some advantages as a backend technology and Java is more advantageous for User interfaces and Web Services. So its better to use these two integrating the positive points of both Technology.

We can even write a JCo (Java Connector)program to access the ABAP system from Java. All this is done so that both these technology can work together for more reliable output.

Hope this solves your problem.

Regards

Pravesh

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