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Confusion about posting, due, doc date

Hello there,

I am very confused by dates used in SBO documents, could anyone please explain for me?

For example,

We receive an invoice from supplier, which is dated on 1st Oct. And then we input it into SAP on 5th Oct.

Based on the payment term, say 30 days, we should pay it by the 4th of Nov (1st Oct +30 days).

So ...

Which is posting date, due date and document date?

As I believe, posting date is 05/10 (as we posted it), due date is 04/11 (when the invoice is due), document date is 01/10 (as the date is on the document). Is that wrong?

If I am right, then

why is that most of reports don't show "document date" but only posting date and due date, such as BP balance, bank reconciliation.

Another example is Cash discount defination, it uses "Days After Posting Date" to calculate discount ...

Hopefully, I am not wrong ...

Edited by: Y on Oct 17, 2008 5:36 PM

Edited by: Y on Oct 17, 2008 5:36 PM

Former Member
replied

Hi Y,

here are some perinent excerpts from the EES:

Posting Date:

Date that determines in which u2018Posting Periodu2019 a document or journal entry is added to the database.

Due Date:

Date that determines when the transaction documented becomes financially significant.

Document Date:

Date that indicates when the shipment of goods takes place.

Example:

Our company sells fruit.

1.) We receive an order & take an apple out of our warehouse to ship to our customer. This date is the u2018Document Dateu2019.

2.) Our customer receives the apple & now accepts liability for the payment. This is the u2018Posting Dateu2019.

3.) We send the customer an invoice where we specify the date when payment for the apple is expected. This is the u2018Due Dateu2019.

I would recommend you speak with the partner, all this info is freely available to all partners.

All the best,

kerstin

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